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Gettysburg to Washington, D.C.

  • Potomac River view
  • Gettysburg monument
  • Fields and farm south of Gettysburg
  • Infinity pool and river at Bavarian Inn
  • Lincoln Memorial at night
  • George Washington's home at Mount Vernon
DURATION
6 Day(s)
DAILY BIKING
31 Miles
TRIP DIFFICULTY
2-Easier to Intermediate
STARTING FROM
$2895
SINGLES FROM
$600

Trip Overview

This popular tour features six days of sensational biking through the beautiful countryside of Pennsylvania and Maryland, followed by leisurely days riding through West Virginia and Virginia along the peaceful C & O Canal towpath that parallels the Potomac River into the outskirts of Washington, D.C. What makes this tour even more special is that we include professionally guided tours of some of the iconic sites of the Civil War such as Gettysburg and Antietam and include a visit to Harpers Ferry. We end the tour with a gentle ride along a bike path that passes by some of the most famous landmarks in our nation’s capital. You begin your tour with two days in Gettysburg and then head south following quiet farm roads to Antietam, where the National Park Service will lead you on a biking tour of the area. The following day we bike along the Potomac River to where it joins the Shenandoah at Harpers Ferry, a handsomely restored historic village made famous by John Brown’s ill-fated raid in 1859. On Thursday we are guided along surprisingly peaceful bike paths that take us past many of Washington’s greatest monuments and buildings, ending appropriately, at the Lincoln Memorial. On our final day we visit George Washington’s home at Mount Vernon. Tour his estate, including a host of colonial-era buildings, beautiful gardens, a working distillery and a gristmill.

Itinerary

From start to finish, check out the route.

DAY 1 - Arrival Day
Distance: 10 miles | Terrain: Easier | Brick House Inn
The tour starts and ends at the Key Bridge Marriott in Arlington, VA (just outside Washington, D.C.). If you plan to drive to the tour you can leave your car at the hotel parking garage until you arrive back there on Friday. If you are flying to the tour, you will fly into Ronald Reagan National Airport and take a short taxi ride to the hotel. Specific details, directions and information on parking fees will be provided in your Confirmation Packet. Our guides will meet you in the main lobby of the hotel at 10 AM and transfer you from there to Gettysburg. On Sunday afternoon you will enjoy a pleasant, easy warm-up ride as well as a visit to the Gettysburg National Park Service Museum and Visitor Center where you will get a primer on the Civil War through short videos, photographs and artifacts like Robert E. Lee’s battlefield cot and desk. The famous Gettysburg Cyclorama is also here, a monumental 1884 painting by the French artist Paul Phillipteaux that depicts Pickett’s Charge. Dinner will be at the historic Dobbins Tavern, where you will feel like you have stepped directly back into the 1860s. You are guests tonight at the Brick House Inn, a historic bed and breakfast located within easy walking distance of downtown Gettysburg.
DAY 2 - Gettysburg’s iconic sites
Distance: 10 or 26 miles | Terrain: Easier to Intermediate | Brick House Inn | Includes Bike Tour of Gettysburg
The day begins with a delicious breakfast on the patio of the inn. Then you will be offered a fascinating four-hour professionally guided bike ride through the major sites of Gettysburg battlefield. As a refresher, in the early summer of 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee began an ambitious invasion of the north. Then, on July 1, Confederate and Union troops collided on the grassy hills of Gettysburg, thrusting this sleepy town of 2,400 into the Civil War. The three-day battle was the war’s turning point and resulted in staggering losses – an estimated 51,000 casualties in all. It was the Civil War’s bloodiest battle and inspired President Abraham Lincoln to come to Gettysburg on November 19, 1863 to deliver “a few appropriate remarks” – the Gettysburg Address. Our guided tour takes us along acres of woodlands, farmlands, craggy ridges and sloping valleys all now part of the Gettysburg National Military Park. The tour includes many stops along the way to explore such iconic sites as McPherson Ridge, Little Round Top, and to perhaps linger a bit longer at the field called the “High Water Mark”, where some 12,000 Confederate infantrymen crossed in a mile-long front known as Pickett’s Charge. Later in the afternoon you have the option for a longer ride that will take you to the 100-foot-long Sachs Covered Bridge. You might also take the opportunity to explore Gettysburg’s compact but lively center, lined with Federal-style buildings and filled with mom-and-pop shops, restaurants, tourism establishments, and a number of historic houses open to the public. Dinner: You are on your own in Gettysburg
DAY 3 - Blue Ridge Mountains
Distance: 29-32 or 37 miles | Terrain: Intermediate | Bavarian Inn | Includes Bike Tour of Antietam
This is one of those perfect biking days! After a transfer over the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, we cycle south through 36 miles of peaceful, traffic-free farm roads and narrow lanes enjoying some of the most spectacular rural views of rolling farmland, green pastures, hayfields and intermittent small hamlets. This bucolic ride takes you into Maryland and ends on a tree-lined seldom used gravel road that brings you into the northeast corner of the Antietam National Historic District. Following a picnic lunch, a biking member of the National Park Service will lead us on a narrated tour through the battlefield. As another refresher, on September 17, 1862, Generals Robert E. Lee and George McClellan faced off near Antietam Creek in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in the first battle of the Civil War to be fought on northern soil. The result was 23,000 soldiers killed, wounded or missing after twelve hours of savage combat. The battle ended in what historians consider an inconclusive “draw”, but the Confederate Army was forced back and this tactical victory led to Abraham Lincoln feeling secure enough to issue his Emancipation Proclamation. Following our ride around Antietam, we bike into historic Sharpsburg and then cross over the Potomac River into West Virginia and beautiful Shepherdstown. We spend our next two nights as guests at the handsome Bavarian Inn where we can enjoy their eleven acres of manicured grounds, the infinity pool, and rooms that all feature balconies overlooking the Potomac.
DAY 4 - Harpers Ferry
Distance: 24 or 29 or 39 miles | Terrain: Easier to Intermediate | Bavarian Inn | Includes Walking Tour of Harpers Ferry
Today features a ride along the Potomac River. Heading south on the scenic C & O towpath we then cross the river on a long former railroad bridge that leads over to Harpers Ferry. This small town is located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, and its strategic location has resulted in it having quite a tumultuous history. The town is mostly famous for John Brown’s raid. John Brown was a radical abolitionist who on October 16, 1859 led a group of 21 men in a raid on the town’s arsenal. His plan was to instigate a major slave rebellion in the South. It didn’t end up so well for John or his men (he was actually captured by General Robert E. Lee who at that time was still in the Union Army) but it did succeed to deepen the divide between the North and South. Lesser known is that in 1862 Lee returned to Harpers Ferry (as a Confederate General) on his way to Antietam and ordered Stonewall Jackson to attack the town (which he did with success), and that a few days later most of Lee’s retreating army passed right through the town on its way back south. Visiting Harper’s Ferry now is like stepping into the past. The town is well protected as a National Historical Site, and as you stroll the picturesque (and hilly!) streets, visit exhibits, authentic period buildings, museums, restaurants, boutiques, book stores, homes, and churches you will see that the National Park Service has done a wonderful job of restoring the town to look and feel like it was in the 1800s. We return back along the C & O Canal and also have a pretty 15-mile optional ride. This is also a chance to linger in Shepherdstown and enjoy its many historical buildings and the many shops, galleries and cafes that make this small college town such a fun place to visit.
DAY 5 - C&O Towpath and D.C.
Distance: 32 or 33 miles | Terrain: Easier | Key Bridge Marriott, Arlington, VA
Today we will start our ride at White’s Ferry where you can see the still operational “Jubal Early,” a ferry boat that is much like the ones that have been used here since 1817. Our ride today is along the C&O towpath, a cyclist’s delight. The path is flat (actually a tad bit downhill) and scenic with beautiful trees and marshes, great views over the river, and assorted wildlife like deer, fox, turtles, blue heron and, at times, even some bald eagles. This is all enjoyed with riding that is so easy you may find you don’t switch gears the whole way. Again, a bit of history as to why this most perfect tree-lined bike path even exists. As early as 1754, George Washington envisioned a system of river and canal navigation along the Potomac River so that merchants in eastern cities could tap into the western region’s resources and markets. Various schemes were suggested and tested over the early years, but ultimately it was decided to construct a separate channel, or canal, paralleling the river for its entire 184.5 miles from Washington, DC to Cumberland, Maryland. You will see on your ride hundreds of original features of this canal system including locks, lock houses, aqueducts and other canal structures. Railroads ultimately spelled the demise of the canal and towpaths, but we are the happy unintended twenty-first century beneficiaries of this huge project. Our section of the towpath includes some interesting sights, such as Swain’s Lock, the huge Seneca Aqueduct, and the Great Falls Visitor Center (former tavern) which contains a small, but well-conceived museum that explains the history, engineering features and daily life of the canal and the people who worked on it. We will also take time to walk out the Olmstead Island Trail to the spectacular overlook high above the massive Great Falls. We end the day at the Key Bridge Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This evening you are treated to a professionally guided bike tour of Washington D.C. sites. Your guides will entertain you with poignant, fascinating and incredible stories about presidents, Congress, memorials, parks, spies and scandals as you visit many of the iconic sites of our nation’s capital.
DAY 6 - Departure Day
Today we include a ride to George Washington’s home at Mount Vernon. Tour his estate, including a host of colonial era buildings, beautiful gardens, a working distillery and a gristmill. Shuttle or bike back to the Key Bridge Marriott Hotel to pick up your car or take a short taxi ride to Ronald Reagan National Airport.

Itinerary

From start to finish, check out the route.

DAY 1 - Arrival Day
Distance: 10 miles | Terrain: Easier | Brick House Inn
On Sunday afternoon you will enjoy a pleasant, easy warm-up ride as well as a visit to the Gettysburg National Park Service Museum and Visitor Center where you will get a primer on the Civil War through short videos, photographs and artifacts like Robert E. Lee’s battlefield cot and desk. The famous Gettysburg Cyclorama is also here, a monumental 1884 painting by the French artist Paul Phillipteaux that depicts Pickett’s Charge. Dinner will be at the historic Dobbins Tavern, where you will feel like you have stepped directly back into the 1860s. You are guests tonight at the Brick House Inn, a historic bed and breakfast located within easy walking distance of downtown Gettysburg.
DAY 2 - Gettysburg’s iconic sites
Distance: 10 or 26 miles | Terrain: Easier to Intermediate | Brick House Inn | Includes Bike Tour of Gettysburg
The day begins with a delicious breakfast on the patio of the inn. Then you will be offered a fascinating four-hour professionally guided bike ride through the major sites of Gettysburg battlefield. As a refresher, in the early summer of 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee began an ambitious invasion of the north. Then, on July 1, Confederate and Union troops collided on the grassy hills of Gettysburg, thrusting this sleepy town of 2,400 into the Civil War. The three-day battle was the war’s turning point and resulted in staggering losses – an estimated 51,000 casualties in all. It was the Civil War’s bloodiest battle and inspired President Abraham Lincoln to come to Gettysburg on November 19, 1863 to deliver “a few appropriate remarks” – the Gettysburg Address. Our guided tour takes us along acres of woodlands, farmlands, craggy ridges and sloping valleys all now part of the Gettysburg National Military Park. The tour includes many stops along the way to explore such iconic sites as McPherson Ridge, Little Round Top, and to perhaps linger a bit longer at the field called the “High Water Mark”, where some 12,000 Confederate infantrymen crossed in a mile-long front known as Pickett’s Charge. Later in the afternoon you have the option for a longer ride that will take you to the 100-foot-long Sachs Covered Bridge. You might also take the opportunity to explore Gettysburg’s compact but lively center, lined with Federal-style buildings and filled with mom-and-pop shops, restaurants, tourism establishments, and a number of historic houses open to the public. You are on your own for dinner tonight in Gettysburg.
DAY 3 - Blue Ridge Mountains
Distance: 29-32 or 37 miles | Terrain: Intermediate | Bavarian Inn | Includes Bike Tour of Antietam
This is one of those perfect biking days! After a transfer over the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, we cycle south through 36 miles of peaceful, traffic-free farm roads and narrow lanes enjoying some of the most spectacular rural views of rolling farmland, green pastures, hayfields and intermittent small hamlets. This bucolic ride takes you into Maryland and ends on a tree-lined seldom used gravel road that brings you into the northeast corner of the Antietam National Historic District. Following a picnic lunch, a biking member of the National Park Service will lead us on a narrated tour through the battlefield. As another refresher, on September 17, 1862, Generals Robert E. Lee and George McClellan faced off near Antietam Creek in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in the first battle of the Civil War to be fought on northern soil. The result was 23,000 soldiers killed, wounded or missing after twelve hours of savage combat. The battle ended in what historians consider an inconclusive “draw”, but the Confederate Army was forced back and this tactical victory led to Abraham Lincoln feeling secure enough to issue his Emancipation Proclamation. Following our ride around Antietam, we bike into historic Sharpsburg and then cross over the Potomac River into West Virginia and beautiful Shepherdstown. We spend our next two nights as guests at the handsome Bavarian Inn where we can enjoy their eleven acres of manicured grounds, the infinity pool, and rooms that all feature balconies overlooking the Potomac.
DAY 4 - Harpers Ferry
Distance: 24 or 29 or 39 miles | Terrain: Easier to Intermediate | Bavarian Inn | Includes Walking Tour of Harpers Ferry
Today features a ride along the Potomac River. Heading south on the scenic C & O towpath we then cross the river on a long former railroad bridge that leads over to Harpers Ferry. This small town is located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, and its strategic location has resulted in it having quite a tumultuous history. The town is mostly famous for John Brown’s raid. John Brown was a radical abolitionist who on October 16, 1859 led a group of 21 men in a raid on the town’s arsenal. His plan was to instigate a major slave rebellion in the South. It didn’t end up so well for John or his men (he was actually captured by General Robert E. Lee who at that time was still in the Union Army) but it did succeed to deepen the divide between the North and South. Lesser known is that in 1862 Lee returned to Harpers Ferry (as a Confederate General) on his way to Antietam and ordered Stonewall Jackson to attack the town (which he did with success), and that a few days later most of Lee’s retreating army passed right through the town on its way back south. Visiting Harper’s Ferry now is like stepping into the past. The town is well protected as a National Historical Site, and as you stroll the picturesque (and hilly!) streets, visit exhibits, authentic period buildings, museums, restaurants, boutiques, book stores, homes, and churches you will see that the National Park Service has done a wonderful job of restoring the town to look and feel like it was in the 1800s. We return back along the C & O Canal and also have a pretty 15-mile optional ride. This is also a chance to linger in Shepherdstown and enjoy its many historical buildings and the many shops, galleries and cafes that make this small college town such a fun place to visit.
DAY 5 - C&O Towpath and D.C.
Distance: 32 or 33 miles | Terrain: Easier | The Watergate
Today we will start our ride at White’s Ferry where you can see the still operational “Jubal Early,” a ferry boat that is much like the ones that have been used here since 1817. Our ride today is along the C&O towpath, a cyclist’s delight. The path is flat (actually a tad bit downhill) and scenic with beautiful trees and marshes, great views over the river, and assorted wildlife like deer, fox, turtles, blue heron and, at times, even some bald eagles. This is all enjoyed with riding that is so easy you may find you don’t switch gears the whole way. Again, a bit of history as to why this most perfect tree-lined bike path even exists. As early as 1754, George Washington envisioned a system of river and canal navigation along the Potomac River so that merchants in eastern cities could tap into the western region’s resources and markets. Various schemes were suggested and tested over the early years, but ultimately it was decided to construct a separate channel, or canal, paralleling the river for its entire 184.5 miles from Washington, DC to Cumberland, Maryland. You will see on your ride hundreds of original features of this canal system including locks, lock houses, aqueducts and other canal structures. Railroads ultimately spelled the demise of the canal and towpaths, but we are the happy unintended twenty-first century beneficiaries of this huge project. Our section of the towpath includes some interesting sights, such as Swain’s Lock, the huge Seneca Aqueduct, and the Great Falls Visitor Center (former tavern) which contains a small, but well-conceived museum that explains the history, engineering features and daily life of the canal and the people who worked on it. We will also take time to walk out the Olmstead Island Trail to the spectacular overlook high above the massive Great Falls. This evening you are treated to a professionally guided bike tour of Washington D.C. sites. Your guides will entertain you with poignant, fascinating and incredible stories about presidents, Congress, memorials, parks, spies and scandals as you visit many of the iconic sites of our nation’s capital.
DAY 6 - Departure Day
Today we include a ride to George Washington’s home at Mount Vernon. Tour his estate, including a host of colonial era buildings, beautiful gardens, a working distillery and a gristmill. Shuttle or bike back toThe Watergate Hotel to pick up your car or take a short taxi ride to Ronald Reagan National Airport.

Itinerary

From start to finish, check out the route.

DAY 1 - Arrival Day
Distance: 10 miles | Terrain: Easier | Brick House Inn
Our guides will meet you in the main lobby of The Watergate hotel at 10 AM and transfer you from there to Gettysburg. On Sunday afternoon you will enjoy a pleasant, easy warm-up ride as well as a visit to the Gettysburg National Park Service Museum and Visitor Center where you will get a primer on the Civil War through short videos, photographs and artifacts like Robert E. Lee’s battlefield cot and desk. The famous Gettysburg Cyclorama is also here, a monumental 1884 painting by the French artist Paul Phillipteaux that depicts Pickett’s Charge. Dinner will be at the historic Dobbins Tavern, where you will feel like you have stepped directly back into the 1860s. You are guests tonight at the Brick House Inn, a historic bed and breakfast located within easy walking distance of downtown Gettysburg.
DAY 2 - Gettysburg’s iconic sites
Distance: 10 or 26 miles | Terrain: Easier to Intermediate | Brick House Inn | Includes Bike Tour of Gettysburg
The day begins with a delicious breakfast on the patio of the inn. Then you will be offered a fascinating four-hour professionally guided bike ride through the major sites of Gettysburg battlefield. As a refresher, in the early summer of 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee began an ambitious invasion of the north. Then, on July 1, Confederate and Union troops collided on the grassy hills of Gettysburg, thrusting this sleepy town of 2,400 into the Civil War. The three-day battle was the war’s turning point and resulted in staggering losses – an estimated 51,000 casualties in all. It was the Civil War’s bloodiest battle and inspired President Abraham Lincoln to come to Gettysburg on November 19, 1863 to deliver “a few appropriate remarks” – the Gettysburg Address. Our guided tour takes us along acres of woodlands, farmlands, craggy ridges and sloping valleys all now part of the Gettysburg National Military Park. The tour includes many stops along the way to explore such iconic sites as McPherson Ridge, Little Round Top, and to perhaps linger a bit longer at the field called the “High Water Mark”, where some 12,000 Confederate infantrymen crossed in a mile-long front known as Pickett’s Charge. Later in the afternoon you have the option for a longer ride that will take you to the 100-foot-long Sachs Covered Bridge. You might also take the opportunity to explore Gettysburg’s compact but lively center, lined with Federal-style buildings and filled with mom-and-pop shops, restaurants, tourism establishments, and a number of historic houses open to the public. Dinner: You are on your own in Gettysburg
DAY 3 - Blue Ridge Mountains
Distance: 29-32 or 37 miles | Terrain: Intermediate | Bavarian Inn | Includes Bike Tour of Antietam
This is one of those perfect biking days! After a transfer over the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, we cycle south through 36 miles of peaceful, traffic-free farm roads and narrow lanes enjoying some of the most spectacular rural views of rolling farmland, green pastures, hayfields and intermittent small hamlets. This bucolic ride takes you into Maryland and ends on a tree-lined seldom used gravel road that brings you into the northeast corner of the Antietam National Historic District. Following a picnic lunch, a biking member of the National Park Service will lead us on a narrated tour through the battlefield. As another refresher, on September 17, 1862, Generals Robert E. Lee and George McClellan faced off near Antietam Creek in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in the first battle of the Civil War to be fought on northern soil. The result was 23,000 soldiers killed, wounded or missing after twelve hours of savage combat. The battle ended in what historians consider an inconclusive “draw”, but the Confederate Army was forced back and this tactical victory led to Abraham Lincoln feeling secure enough to issue his Emancipation Proclamation. Following our ride around Antietam, we bike into historic Sharpsburg and then cross over the Potomac River into West Virginia and beautiful Shepherdstown. We spend our next two nights as guests at the handsome Bavarian Inn where we can enjoy their eleven acres of manicured grounds, the infinity pool, and rooms that all feature balconies overlooking the Potomac.
DAY 4 - Harpers Ferry
Distance: 24 or 29 or 39 miles | Terrain: Easier to Intermediate | Bavarian Inn | Includes Walking Tour of Harpers Ferry
Today features a ride along the Potomac River. Heading south on the scenic C & O towpath we then cross the river on a long former railroad bridge that leads over to Harpers Ferry. This small town is located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, and its strategic location has resulted in it having quite a tumultuous history. The town is mostly famous for John Brown’s raid. John Brown was a radical abolitionist who on October 16, 1859 led a group of 21 men in a raid on the town’s arsenal. His plan was to instigate a major slave rebellion in the South. It didn’t end up so well for John or his men (he was actually captured by General Robert E. Lee who at that time was still in the Union Army) but it did succeed to deepen the divide between the North and South. Lesser known is that in 1862 Lee returned to Harpers Ferry (as a Confederate General) on his way to Antietam and ordered Stonewall Jackson to attack the town (which he did with success), and that a few days later most of Lee’s retreating army passed right through the town on its way back south. Visiting Harper’s Ferry now is like stepping into the past. The town is well protected as a National Historical Site, and as you stroll the picturesque (and hilly!) streets, visit exhibits, authentic period buildings, museums, restaurants, boutiques, book stores, homes, and churches you will see that the National Park Service has done a wonderful job of restoring the town to look and feel like it was in the 1800s. We return back along the C & O Canal and also have a pretty 15-mile optional ride. This is also a chance to linger in Shepherdstown and enjoy its many historical buildings and the many shops, galleries and cafes that make this small college town such a fun place to visit.
DAY 5 - C&O Towpath and D.C.
Distance: 32 or 33 miles | Terrain: Easier | The Watergate
Today we will start our ride at White’s Ferry where you can see the still operational “Jubal Early,” a ferry boat that is much like the ones that have been used here since 1817. Our ride today is along the C&O towpath, a cyclist’s delight. The path is flat (actually a tad bit downhill) and scenic with beautiful trees and marshes, great views over the river, and assorted wildlife like deer, fox, turtles, blue heron and, at times, even some bald eagles. This is all enjoyed with riding that is so easy you may find you don’t switch gears the whole way. Again, a bit of history as to why this most perfect tree-lined bike path even exists. As early as 1754, George Washington envisioned a system of river and canal navigation along the Potomac River so that merchants in eastern cities could tap into the western region’s resources and markets. Various schemes were suggested and tested over the early years, but ultimately it was decided to construct a separate channel, or canal, paralleling the river for its entire 184.5 miles from Washington, DC to Cumberland, Maryland. You will see on your ride hundreds of original features of this canal system including locks, lock houses, aqueducts and other canal structures. Railroads ultimately spelled the demise of the canal and towpaths, but we are the happy unintended twenty-first century beneficiaries of this huge project. Our section of the towpath includes some interesting sights, such as Swain’s Lock, the huge Seneca Aqueduct, and the Great Falls Visitor Center (former tavern) which contains a small, but well-conceived museum that explains the history, engineering features and daily life of the canal and the people who worked on it. We will also take time to walk out the Olmstead Island Trail to the spectacular overlook high above the massive Great Falls. This evening you are treated to a professionally guided bike tour of Washington D.C. sites. Your guides will entertain you with poignant, fascinating and incredible stories about presidents, Congress, memorials, parks, spies and scandals as you visit many of the iconic sites of our nation’s capital.
DAY 6 - Departure Day
Today we include a ride to George Washington’s home at Mount Vernon. Tour his estate, including a host of colonial era buildings, beautiful gardens, a working distillery and a gristmill. Shuttle or bike back to the Watergate to pick up your car or take a short taxi ride to Ronald Reagan National Airport.

Map

Picture of Gettysburg to Washington, D.C.

Dates & Pricing

Make your reservation with confidence. Your tour is completely 100% refundable until the final payment due date.

Start End Cost Availability
Jun 21, 2020 Jun 26, 2020 $2895.00 Available! Reserve Reserve
Jun 28, 2020 Jul 03, 2020 $2895.00 Available! Reserve Reserve
Sep 06, 2020 Sep 11, 2020 $2895.00 Available! Reserve Reserve
Oct 04, 2020 Oct 09, 2020 $2895.00 Available! Reserve Reserve

What’s Included

Museum entry, guided bike tours of Gettysburg, Antietam and Washington, D.C. ; 5 nights' lodging, 5 breakfasts, 4 dinners, 3 lunches, all gratuities for accommodations and meals, detailed maps and itineraries, experienced guides, full van support, bicycle, and helmet. Transfer from Key Bridge Marriott to Gettysburg at 9:30 a.m. on the first day of your tour. Airfare is not included.

Dates & Pricing

Make your reservation with confidence. Your tour is completely 100% refundable until the final payment due date.

Start: Jun 21, 2020
End: Jun 26, 2020
Cost: $2895.00
Availability: Available!
Reserve
Start: Jun 28, 2020
End: Jul 03, 2020
Cost: $2895.00
Availability: Available!
Reserve
Start: Sep 06, 2020
End: Sep 11, 2020
Cost: $2895.00
Availability: Available!
Reserve
Start: Oct 04, 2020
End: Oct 09, 2020
Cost: $2895.00
Availability: Available!
Reserve

What’s Included

Museum entry, guided bike tours of Gettysburg, Antietam and Washington, D.C. ; 5 nights' lodging, 5 breakfasts, 4 dinners, 3 lunches, all gratuities for accommodations and meals, detailed maps and itineraries, experienced guides, full van support, bicycle, and helmet. Transfer from Key Bridge Marriott to Gettysburg at 9:30 a.m. on the first day of your tour. Airfare is not included.

Inns

Where you stay along the way.

Brick House Inn
The Brickhouse Inn consists of two historic buildings in the downtown historic area of Gettysburg – the premier bed and breakfast in Gettysburg. The 1898 three-story Victorian mansion has original wood floors, chestnut trim, family heirlooms and antiques, all in a style reminiscent of the turn of the century. The c.1830 Welty House was occupied by the Confederate sharpshooters during the Battle of Gettysburg and has many bullet scars on its south wall.
Bavarian Inn
A romantic country inn offering European elegance and world class service from its scenic location perched on a bluff overlooking the Potomac River. The charming and historic inn is owned by the Asam family, who maintain the highest standard in hospitality, gourmet dining and guest comfort. Many of the 72 luxuriously appointed rooms feature gas fireplaces and whirlpool baths among their amenities. The 11 acre grounds include an Infinity Pool and Bar, Tennis Court and multiple formal and casual dining options.
Key Bridge Marriot
Explore Washington, DC from one of the most conveniently-located hotels in Arlington, VA, Key Bridge Marriott. Located across the river from Georgetown via a pedestrian friendly bridge, this hotel offers access to the Nation’s Capital, as well as many vibrant Northern Virginia neighborhoods. Well-appointed guest rooms and suites boast perks for the modern traveler. The Key Bridge Marriott allows you to experience one-of-a-kind panoramic views of nearby Georgetown.

Inns

Where you stay along the way.

Brick House Inn
The Brickhouse Inn consists of two historic buildings in the downtown historic area of Gettysburg – the premier bed and breakfast in Gettysburg. The 1898 three-story Victorian mansion has original wood floors, chestnut trim, family heirlooms and antiques, all in a style reminiscent of the turn of the century. The c.1830 Welty House was occupied by the Confederate sharpshooters during the Battle of Gettysburg and has many bullet scars on its south wall.
Bavarian Inn
A romantic country inn offering European elegance and world class service from its scenic location perched on a bluff overlooking the Potomac River. The charming and historic inn is owned by the Asam family, who maintain the highest standard in hospitality, gourmet dining and guest comfort. Many of the 72 luxuriously appointed rooms feature gas fireplaces and whirlpool baths among their amenities. The 11 acre grounds include an Infinity Pool and Bar, Tennis Court and multiple formal and casual dining options.
The Watergate

Inns

Where you stay along the way.

Brick House Inn
The Brickhouse Inn consists of two historic buildings in the downtown historic area of Gettysburg – the premier bed and breakfast in Gettysburg. The 1898 three-story Victorian mansion has original wood floors, chestnut trim, family heirlooms and antiques, all in a style reminiscent of the turn of the century. The c.1830 Welty House was occupied by the Confederate sharpshooters during the Battle of Gettysburg and has many bullet scars on its south wall.
Bavarian Inn
A romantic country inn offering European elegance and world class service from its scenic location perched on a bluff overlooking the Potomac River. The charming and historic inn is owned by the Asam family, who maintain the highest standard in hospitality, gourmet dining and guest comfort. Many of the 72 luxuriously appointed rooms feature gas fireplaces and whirlpool baths among their amenities. The 11 acre grounds include an Infinity Pool and Bar, Tennis Court and multiple formal and casual dining options.
The Watergate
Step inside a legendary Washington DC luxury hotel revival at The Watergate Hotel. This urban resort, located along the banks of the Potomac River, sets itself apart from hotels in Georgetown, Washington DC. Here, modern design blends with an iconic landmark to redefine luxury.

Gallery

Images from this tour. Click each to see it larger.

Potomac River view Gettysburg monument Fields and farm south of Gettysburg Infinity pool and river at Bavarian Inn Lincoln Memorial at night George Washington's home at Mount Vernon